gb.mpmn-digital.com
New recipes

8 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog

8 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Eggnog is a classic holiday drink, but there are some things you might not know about it

Our nation’s first president made his own boozy recipe for a holiday drink very similar to eggnog.

There isn’t a boozy holiday drink more beloved in America than eggnog. In our opinion, no holiday celebration is complete without a bottle of eggnog. Whether you like it homemade or store-bought, it’s an iconic holiday tradition.

8 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog (Slideshow)

Traditional eggnog (made with milk, whipped eggs, sugar, a type of liquor such as rum or whiskey, and often seasonal spices like cinnamon and nutmeg) dates back to the fourteenth century and remains a delicious part of holiday traditions in America and Canada. Cultures around the world make their own versions of "eggnog," too.

Eggnog is a classic holiday drink, but there are some things you might not know about it, like how it got its name, where the drink came from, and which U.S. president had his own eggnog recipe.

Grab a cup and click through our slideshow to find out these and more things you didn’t know about eggnog.

Origin of the Name

The origin of the name eggnog is still somewhat of a mystery to etymologists. It’s thought that the word could be derived from noggin, the Old English word for strong beer. Others credit the name to Colonial America when colonists called thick drinks grog, and eggnog was called egg-and-grog.

Descendent of the Hot Cocktail “Posset”

Eggnog is believed to be a descendent of a hot cocktail from the fourteenth century known as posset. The drink didn’t contain eggs but was made with sweetened and spiced milk and ale or wine. We would guess that over the years, egg was added.

Haley Willard is The Daily Meal's assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.


Eggnog Trivia: 5 odd things you didn’t know

Eggnog, that quintessential holiday libation, wasn’t always made in a carton, of course. Here are five bits of trivia — tidbits you probably didn’t know about the creamy concoction.

1. Eggnog dates back to 14th-century England. It was called posset — a sweetened mixture of curdled hot milk mixed with a sherry-like wine. Eggs came later.

2. It was American colonists who went all eggy with the drink, adding beaten eggs and quaffing the results in Jamestown, Va., as early as 1607, according to notes made by Capt. John Smith, of Pocahontas-rescue fame. Spiking eggnog with rum was a colonial idea, too.

3. Just tell yourself that drinking eggnog is patriotic. George Washington mixed rye, rum and sherry into his Mount Vernon recipe.

4. Eggnog was the cause of a major riot at West Point in 1826, after Col. Sylvanus Thayer banned booze at the military academy. Cadets, who had always enjoyed a little tipple during the holidays, rebelled by throwing the party to end all parties. The resulting Eggnog Riot — a ruckus that involved 70 cadets, assaults and vandalism of the North Barracks — ended in court-martial trials for 19 cadets and a soldier.

5. No one drinks posset anymore — at least no one with a discriminating palate and hatred of curdled milk — but there are plenty of variations on the eggnog theme, including the Tom and Jerry, a warm version of spiked eggnog that dates back to the 19th century, and Germany’s Eierpunsch.