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DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement

DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement


DoorDash settled a lawsuit from In-N-Out in 2015

Leonard W./Yelp

California-based online delivery service DoorDash is currently under fire from a suburban Chicago restaurant called Burger Antics, which claims the company has used its logo and sold its food without permission. According to Burger Antics owners Dan and Brenna Velcich, DoorDash was never authorized by the restaurant to post its menu or deliver its food. DoorDash has been fending off similar complaints from other restaurants for years, which is why the Velciches are seeking class-action status.

The Brookfield restaurant caught wind of DoorDash’s antics after they began receiving complaints from customers of cold food and late delivery service. Terrence Buehler, the attorney representing Burger Antics, told the Chicago Tribune, “They have no delivery service and don’t want one.”

This is not the first time DoorDash has been involved in a lawsuit like this. In-N-Out filed a lawsuit against the delivery service in 2015 for trademark infringement. The California-based burger chain is no longer listed on the food delivery site.

DoorDash has since removed Burger Antics from its website, but the lawsuit is ongoing. “What [the removal] does not address is the nine documented orders DoorDash placed with Burger Antics,” Buehler said. “I guess I’ll wait to hear from the DoorDash lawyers and see what their view is on it.” Luckily, Chicago is home to some of the best burgers in America; many of which can be delivered to its surrounding suburbs — even Brookfield.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.


DoorDash Faces Lawsuit From Suburban Chicago Restaurant Over Trademark Infringement - Recipes

The Australian Government has released its response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry nearly 18 months after the Inquiry tabled its final report, Fairness in Franchising, and nine months after consultation ended on a draft regulation impact statement.

The 20-page government response to the Inquiry report does not specifically address the Inquiry’s 71 recommendations – 27 of which were referred to a Franchising Taskforce comprised of government agencies to assess in more detail – but does address themes from the Inquiry to cover pre-entry, operational, and exit issues in franchise relationships.

The response includes the following highlight items:

  • Doubling of penalties that apply for a breach of the Franchising Code (potentially up to 600 penalty units, or $1333,200 per breach)
  • The introduction of conciliation and voluntary binding arbitration in addition to mediation
  • Further disclosure requirements re supply arrangements (including rebates), marketing funds, exit arrangements and capital expenditure requirements
  • A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet to summarise elements of the agreement
  • A public register of franchisors (yet to be developed)
  • A website for franchisors and franchisees to access information and support
  • An extension of the cooling-off period to at least 14 days after the completion of certain events (ie not just signing the franchise agreement
  • Banning franchisors from charging the costs of preparing franchise agreements.

The response does not indicate an implementation timeframe, however past Code amendments have come into effect by the final date that disclosure documents are required to be updated (ie. October 31 for franchisors with a June 30 year end), or 1 January. To read the full report, click here.

Code penalties doubled, cooling-off extended, more disclosure required

Penalties for breaches of the Franchising Code of Conduct will be increased from a maximum of 300 to 600 penalty units under changes expected to be introduced following the Government’s official response to the 2018 Franchise Inquiry.

Penalty units determine the size of a financial penalty to be imposed for a breach of a mandatory industry code, which recently increased from $210 per unit to $222 per unit, making it possible for a franchisor to incur a total fine of $133,200 for a single breach of the Franchising Code.

The cooling-off period has also been increased, from seven days from signing a franchise agreement to now 14 days after the last of certain events have occurred, such as the agreement being signed, payment is made, disclosure documents are received, and if applicable, a copy of the terms of the lease are received. Cooling off will also apply to transfers where the franchisee enters a substantially new agreement with the franchisor. Overall, the new requirement is expected to extend franchise recruitment timeframes.

A new Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet must be provided by franchisors to summarise information in the disclosure document, particularly financial information likely to include details of fees, rebates, commissions, and any entitlement to goodwill at the end of the franchise term. Read more

Greater transparency of rebates and marketing funds

Franchisors will be required to disclose information on supplier rebates under changes proposed by the Government response, however it is unclear if this will require disclosure of the amount or percentage of rebate received from each supplier.

Where a supplier rebate to the franchisor results in a substantial lessening in competition, this will trigger a breach of the Competition and Consumer Act (CCA). The Government has left the door open for the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to conduct its own inquiry about the about rebates in franchising once the new disclosure provisions have had time to take effect.

The Franchising Code will be amended to clarify requirements relating to the treatment and reporting of marketing funds, and apply financial penalties to breaches of these requirements.

Additionally, the government will further consider whether guidance for auditing of marketing and cooperative funds is required, but leave the current requirement for annual reporting of marketing funds in place.

New website to provide more information for potential franchisees

A major element of the Government’s response to the Franchise Inquiry is the development of a new website to provide more information to potential franchisees (and potential franchisors), which will be noted in the mandatory Information Statement, which must be given to potential franchisees at the earliest opportunity.

The website will include information resources, as well as details about how to lodge a complaint about a franchisor.

The response does not indicate if the new website will also include the public register of franchisors, or the pre-entry education program for potential franchisees previously offered by Griffith University.

Government to undertake further consultation

The Government has undertaken to consult with the franchise sector further in regards to:

  • The development of a public register of franchisors
  • The Key Disclosure Information Fact Sheet, to be drawn from information in the disclosure document
  • The franchising-specific website to provide information for potential franchisees and franchisors
  • Changes to the Code to increase transparency surrounding retail leases.

Capital expenditure issues highlighted

The Franchising Code will be changed to prohibit franchisors from requiring franchisees to undertake significant capital expenditure, except where it has been disclosed up front, is legally required, or is agreed to by the franchisee.

Capital expenditure must be discussed before entering a franchise agreement, the timing and amount of expenditure should also be provided, and disclosure of the circumstances under which franchisees may recoup their investment.

Changes to impact the Oil Code

The amendments to the Franchising Code of Conduct will impact the Oil Code, with the Government noting that it supports consistency of the Oil Code with the Franchising Code when the Oil Code is due for its mid-term review.

Recent amendments to the Franchising Code to apply specifically to the automotive sector dealing with capital expenditure (see article above) will also be extended to the Franchising Code more broadly to affect all franchisors.

To read the full Government response to the Franchise Inquiry, click here.