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A Guide to the World's Coffee Regions

A Guide to the World's Coffee Regions


Where your coffee comes from, and the different tastes of the various regions

Terroir is a term that can be applied to your coffee, too.

Sure, when it's early in the morning, the last thing you're really thinking about is where your coffee comes from — you just need it. Now. But let the caffeine work its magic, and you might find yourself wondering — where exactly does your coffee come from?

Click here for The Guide to the World's Coffee Regions (Slideshow)

Sure enough, the next time you're at the grocery store or coffee shop perusing the endless amount of coffee bags, you may be wondering exactly what difference it makes where your coffee comes from. Kenya or Ethiopia? Brazil or Colombia? Sumatra? Jamaica Blue Mountain? (Are those not vacation destinations that make us wish to be heading out of the country?) The question is, how do a few thousand miles change how your coffee tastes from the ground to the cup?

As we've discovered with both wine, and water (seriously, don't take our word for it), terroir is a term that can be applied to your coffee, too. Just as soil, climate, and weather conditions play a big part in a wine's composition, the same factors play a big part in a coffee's composition. They often determine the acidity of a coffee, its flavors, and body — sounding similar to your wine terminology yet? As Meister at Serious Eats notes, there are also factors like how the plant is grown that can influence the taste of the coffee. And of course, each region processes and roasts its coffees differently. Some regions, like some parts of Ethiopia, "wash" their coffee, giving it an entirely different taste than "natural" coffees.

Still, despite the endless amount of variance between coffee varieties and where they're from, there are still some basic guidelines to how each coffee-growing regions' coffees taste. Click ahead for a guide to the tasting differences of each major coffee-growing region.


11 Best Coffee Books: Brew Up a Pot of Knowledge

Our piping hot obsession with the benefits of coffee is shared by millions, and it’s only getting more and more prevalent. In fact, it’s pretty hard to drink java without falling in love with the farming, roasting, flavors, recipes, craft, and buzz of this product — the entirety of coffee is all at once so simple and yet so incredibly complex.

After pouring over dozens of titles and drinking the best coffee around, we found the best books about coffee that will teach you something new and interesting, whether you’re a simple fan or a highly trained barista. This list of the best coffee books covers sociology, entrepreneurship, fair trade, and how to make the best damn cup of coffee from home, so put on a fresh pot and enjoy these good reads.


Coffee recipes

The Italian coffee culture is renowned the world over, and for many is the epitome of cool sophistication. When it's not being downed in a coffee bar in the time honoured tradition, coffee is used as an ingredient in a number of classic Italian dishes including affogato and tiramisu – the latter with plenty of alcohol, coffee's longtime collaborator.

This collection of coffee recipes contains plenty of inspiration for delicious desserts – and slightly more unusual dinner party ideas, too. Daniele Usai's Coffee and hazelnut chocolate dessert recipe showcases three perfectly matched ingredients, while Mauro Uliassi's Molasses cookie recipe pairs salted caramel with a dark chocolate and coffee ice cream. Don't limit your use of coffee strictly to desserts, either – the Costardi Brothers' Parmesan risotto recipe is garnished with a dusting of bitter coffee and a drizzle of lager reduction.


Coffee Flavors Around The World

With over 50 coffee-producing countries, we can’t hope to describe all of them in this article. Let’s shine a spotlight on some of them, however.

Africa

Richard Keane, Q-grader and Co-Owner of the family-owned and US-based green bean importers Balzac Brothers , tells me that when he looks to buy coffee from Africa, he’s looking for acidity and fruity notes.

In particular, he tells me that, from Ethiopia, he’ll be searching for a tea-like body, blueberry aroma, and as much acidity and fruity notes as possible. From Kenya , on the other hand, he would want grapefruit notes and a dry, clean acidity – one that, he tells me, is more like wine than tomato soup.

Other notable African origins include Rwanda and Burundi , countries known for their sweetness and body.

The Americas

Central Americans will often taste familiar to a US palate, thanks to their proximity. Richard tells me that the countries here are characterised by balance: all the different elements work together to create what is, usually, a great coffee. You can expect a good body, good acidity, and fruitiness.

Head down into South America, and you’ll come across Colombia – one of the most famous coffee origins in the world. Like Central Americans, Colombian coffee tends to be balanced. They’re also known for their sweetness and aroma.

Head further and you’ll reach Brazil , the world’s largest coffee producer. Responsible for one-third of the world’s coffee, it’s arguably defined what we think of as “a coffee flavour”. We’re talking nutty, buttery, and chocolatey notes with a heavy body. Richard tells me that Brazil has a bad reputation in the specialty coffee industry, but that this isn’t always accurate. It’s one of several countries starting to produce coffee with “clean, fruity, bright, acidic notes,” he says.

A producer turns drying coffee at Cuatro M mill, El Salvador.

Asia

A huge continent, Asia offers plenty of diversity in its origins. The most famous include Indonesia, known for an earthy or smoky profile – although Richard tells me you can find fruity notes and huge bodies here – and Vietnam, the world’s second-largest producer of coffee. Vietnam primarily producers Robusta, however, a coffee species known for being bitter and less aromatic.

Then there are less well-known countries with the potential for distinctive crops. Myanmar has recently impressed the specialty coffee community with its clean, high-quality coffees. Papua New Guinea can produce sweet, fruity coffees, although it also faces challenges with infrastructure.

he Philippines, Thailand, India, Laos … these countries shouldn’t be overlooked either.

Coffee picking in Santa Lucia, Honduras.


A Beginner&rsquos Guide to Coffee Flavor Profiles of the World

One of the biggest coffee trends to emerge over the last few years has been the move toward single-origin coffee. These days, it seems that every cafe, from independently owned craft roasters like Blue Bottle Coffee to major chains like Starbucks and Peet’s, has a single-origin option on the menu. You can even find single-origin coffee at 7-Eleven. Single-origin coffee is generally more expensive than blends, but the use of the phrase isn’t just part of some elaborate marketing ploy. “Single-origin” actually refers to the geographic origin of coffee beans. Knowing where your coffee comes from matters because where coffee is grown can have a major impact on the flavor of your brew.

Coffee that’s grown and harvested in Guatemala, for example, has a different flavor profile than coffee from Java or Yemen, due to differences in climate, soil, and other miscellaneous factors. And though each batch of beans will taste slightly differently, even if they come from the same farm, there are some generalizations you can make about these coffee flavor profiles from different regions.

So if you’re ready to learn a thing or two about where you coffee comes from and feel less intimidated the next time a barista asks you if you𠆝 prefer a cup of drip coffee from Colombia or Sumatra, here’s Extra Crispy’s guide to coffee flavor profiles of the world.


60kg bags
2016: 3,800,000 = 501,600,000 lbs
2015: 3,649,567 = 481,742,844 lbs
2014: 3,744,477 = 494,270,964 lbs
2013: 3,632,867 = 479,538,444 lbs
2012: 3,913,502 = 516,582,264 lbs

60kg bags
2016: 0 = 0 lbs
2015: 3,315,570 = 437,655,240 lbs
2014: 3,455,250 = 456,093,000 lbs
2013: 3,499,830 = 461,977,560 lbs
2012: 3,583,260 = 472,990,320 lbs

Data may not be available for the most recent year.
Source: ICO


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Robusta (Coffea caniphora)

You’ve also probably heard of Robusta as it comes second to Arabica as the world’s most produced coffee.

Its name is no coincidence. The Robusta varietal is extremely tolerant of its environment and practically immune to disease. Robusta coffee can withstand myriad altitudes, but particularly requires a hot climate where rainfall is irregular. Robusta coffee beans have almost double the amount of caffeine compared to Arabica beans—in fact, caffeine is what makes Robusta plants so robust! Caffeine is the plant’s self-defense against disease.

When drinking, Robusta coffee is best sampled on the back palate (where bitter notes are most apparent), which gives it a heavier body. Higher quality Robusta beans have a smooth texture, low acidity, and often have hints of chocolate associated with their flavor profile. For the best tasting experience when brewing at home, buy Robusta coffee that has information on the way it was grown—this is often information provided on bags of single-origin coffee— as many times, farmers try to take advantage of Robusta’s popularity and grow the bean in unfavorable climates, producing a sub-standard product if your Robusta has a flat smell or rubbery taste, your coffee has been a victim of these practices.

This is a perfect coffee for cream and sugar lovers! A good quality Robusta will not lose flavor when adding milk or sugar (making it a great candidate for Vietnamese Coffee and Iced Coffee).

Liberica (Coffea liberica)

Liberica is harder to come by in the coffee world these days, but this varietal has an important place in the world’s coffee history.

In 1890, coffee rust decimated over 90% of the world’s Arabica stock. Scrambling to find a solution, farmers and government agents alike turned to the Liberica plant the first country to try this was the Philippines (which was a U.S. territory at the time). This decision greatly helped the Philippines’ economy as they were the only coffee supplier for a time.

However, a spat between the U.S. and the Philippines (over the country declaring independence) broke out this led to the U.S. cutting supplies off, including coffee, to the archipelago. It wasn’t until 1995 that Liberica made an appearance in the coffee world again conservationists salvaged the last remaining plants by transplanting them in Filipino growing regions better suited for Liberica to thrive. Sadly, this effort was too little too late as Arabica wore the crown (that it still wears today) as the reigning coffee varietal of the world by the time the crop was ready for harvest. Its absence can still be felt today as it grows harder and harder to come by pure Liberica coffee.

Liberica beans are larger than the others, often asymmetrical, and they’re the only coffee bean in the world that has such an irregular shape. The beans are said to have a unique aroma, consisting of floral and fruity notes, with a full body that possesses a smoky taste those who have had Liberica coffee say that it is unlike any coffee they have ever tasted—with many saying it does not even taste like coffee, stating that it tastes too “woody”.

Excelsa (Coffea excelsa or Coffea liberica var. dewevrei)

Although Excelsa has been recently re-classified as a member of the Liberica family, the two couldn’t be more different it differs so much from Liberica that some members of the coffee community still think of it as a separate species. It was re-named as a genus of Liberica because it grows on large 20-30 ft trees like Liberica at similar altitudes and has a similar almond-like shape.

Excelsa grows mostly in Southeast Asia and accounts for a mere 7% of the world’s coffee circulation. It is largely used in blends in order to give the coffee an extra boost of flavor and complexity, better affecting the middle and back palate. Excelsa is said to possess a tart and fruity body—which are flavors reminiscent of a light roast—that also somehow has dark, roasty notes. This mystery lures coffee drinkers from around the world to try and seek out the varietal.


Advanced Search

Coffee Review has published more than six thousand reviews since 1997. To find the reviews you are looking for more quickly, you can refine your search by checking the boxes below that match your desired criteria. You may further narrow your search by entering a key word or phrase in the space below the boxes.

High-toned, juicy-bright. Pineapple, cocoa nib, lemon verbena, myrrh, narcissus in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with bold, balanced acidity syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Fruit- and cocoa-toned finish supported by narcissus-like floral notes.

Crisply sweet, rich-toned. Baking chocolate, almond butter, honeysuckle, red grape, maple syrup in aroma and cup. Deeply sweet structure with gentle, round acidity full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Baking chocolate and red grape complicate the quiet, nut-toned finish.

Crisply sweet, cocoa toned. Cocoa powder, date, oak, magnolia, hint of cinnamon in aroma and cup. Sweet-toned structure with pert acidity velvety mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to notes of magnolia and oak.

Crisply sweet, complex, cocoa- and floral-toned. Cocoa nib, star jasmine, plum, tangerine zest, agave syrup in aroma and cup. Vibrantly sweet structure with juicy-bright acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. Chocolaty finish with undertones of plum and tangerine zest.

Evaluated as espresso. Roast-rounded, chocolaty. Dark chocolate, gardenia, gently scorched cedar, molasses, prune in aroma and small cup. Viscous, creamy mouthfeel chocolaty, slightly smoky finish. In three parts milk, floral and chocolate notes preside.

Vibrant, gently fruit-toned. Dried apricot, lemon drop, freesia-like flowers, oak, honey in aroma and cup. Sweetly tart structure with brisk acidity full, satiny-smooth mouthfeel. The resonant finish consolidates to notes of lemon balm and honey, supported by fresh-cut oak.

Bright, juicy, fruit-toned. Lychee, plum blossom, Meyer lemon zest, sandalwood, nougat in aroma and cup. Sweetly tart structure with vibrant acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to attractive notes of lychee and nougat with sandalwood undertones.

Rich-toned, chocolaty. Baking chocolate, almond nougat, date, fresh-cut fir, a hint of gardenia in aroma and cup. Sweet in structure with gentle, round acidity full, velvety-smooth mouthfeel. The gently drying finish is chocolaty and richly sweet.

Rich-toned, juicy, complex. Dried persimmon, wild honey, myrrh, almond butter, star jasmine in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with high-toned, vibrant acidity very full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Long, lingering, rich finish that honors all of the cup’s aromatics.

Evaluated as espresso. Chocolaty, fruit-toned, savory-sweet. Chocolate fudge, pomegranate, saltwater taffy, frankincense, hop flowers in aroma and small cup. Creamy mouthfeel complex, resonant finish. The milk shot is equal parts chocolaty, floral, and fruity.

Richly and cleanly fruit-forward. Dried apricot, freesia-like flowers, nougat, cocoa nib, cedar in aroma and cup. Sweet-toned with juicy, bright acidity rich, satiny mouthfeel. Flavor consolidates to pretty notes of dried apricot and nougat with undertones of cedar.

Crisply sweet, deeply rich. Baking chocolate, hazelnut nougat, narcissus, red grape, fresh-cut oak in aroma and cup. Sweet, balanced structure with brisk acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. The finish centers around notes of baking chocolate and hazelnut supported by red grape and fresh-cut oak.

Brightly and brilliantly fruit- and floral-toned. Raspberries on fresh goat cheese, narcissus-like flowers, fresh pipe tobacco, hints of chocolate and musk in aroma and cup. Roundly and gently lactic-tart in structure, with bright acidity full, nectar-like mouthfeel. Deep, rich, flavor-saturated finish.

Delicately bright, balanced, crisply sweet. Bing cherry, cocoa nib, lemon yogurt, lavender, fresh-cut oak in aroma and cup. Sweetly tangy with gently lactic, savory-edged acidity silky, buoyant mouthfeel. A fruit-driven finish is supported by cocoa nib with a continued gentle lactic tang.

Juicy, bright, confidently fruit- and floral-toned. Candy cap mushroom, dark chocolate, kefir, plumeria, mesquite in aroma and cup. Tangy-sweet structure with lactic-toned acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. Long, resonant, flavor-saturated finish.

Pungently sweet-savory, deep, expressive. Dark chocolate, dried mango, fine musk, rum barrel, honeysuckle in aroma and cup. Richly sweet-savory structure with roundly tart acidity full, creamy mouthfeel. Particularly musky, fruit-toned finish with dark chocolate undertones.

Lactic, chocolaty, sweetly tart. Young goat cheese, dark chocolate, roasted pine nut, persimmon, fresh-cut cedar in aroma and cup. Tart-sweet structure with deeply tangy, lactic acidity very full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Finish consolidates to an attractive chocolate-toned kefir.

Earth-toned, richly sweet-savory. Moist cedar, breadfruit, magnolia, cocoa powder, musk. Savory-leaning with sweetly brisk acidity light-footed, smooth mouthfeel. A hazelnut-like note emerges in the finish, alongside cocoa powder and moist cedar.

Crisply chocolaty, delicately sweet. Baking chocolate, vanilla bean, pink peppercorn, lavender, cedar in aroma and cup. Crisply sweet, balanced structure with bright but lush acidity delicately silky mouthfeel. Wood-framed finish with undertones of vanilla and lavender.

Rich, deep, resoundingly lactic and pungent. Distinct dark chocolate, blue cheese, lily-like flowers, vanilla, pipe tobacco. Savory sweet structure tangy acidity. Plush, velvety mouthfeel. The chocolate and blue cheese notes sustain in a surprisingly balanced, harmonic finish.


Coffee culture is evolving. No longer is coffee just an enabler for our desperation-filled all-nighters or something we hide under layers of sugar, whipped cream and pumpkin spice — today, coffee is something complex and delicious to be appreciated, experimented with and respected. Though Starbucks and Peet’s still reign supreme, local artisan shops are becoming more and more popular, touting single-source coffee, light-roasting techniques and fair-trade beans. With educated baristas, a list of expensive coffee-making accessories and even their own coffee-education courses, these coffee shops are a coffee lover’s dream. But, for the rest of us, the bombardment of new coffee information can be overwhelming. Do I like Ethiopian coffee or Indonesian? Washed coffee or dry? Dark roast or light? For someone who has spent the last four years drinking Starbucks’ Vanilla Light Frappucino, these are some difficult questions.

In reality, the flavor of coffee is almost impossible to generalize. There are so many factors that affect the taste: the altitude of the plant, the ripeness of the fruit and how thoroughly the bean was washed. We can, however, get a pretty good idea of what a cup of coffee will taste like depending on what part of the world it’s from. And, as single-source coffee is a growing trend today, being able to distinguish the different tastes from different countries will help you choose the flavor of coffee you enjoy the most. So here at Eating Berkeley, we’ve compiled a beginner’s guide to coffee flavor based on region. Remember, this doesn’t take into account the brewing or roasting process, which can really affect the final result. But hopefully, next time you enter an artisan coffee shop filled with thick-glassed, American Apparel-wearing hipsters and an extensive, convoluted menu, you won’t feel quite as lost.

Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua)

Being our closest neighbor, Central America has greatly influenced our coffee-flavor profile. These coffees are usually very balanced with a good mixture of smooth sweetness and some tart, fruity acidity (the brightness of the coffee’s taste). They are often described as having a “clean” flavor.

South America (Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador, Bolivia)

Brazil is actually the world’s largest coffee producer, providing 25 percent of the United States’ coffee beans. South American coffee is relatively similar to Central American coffee: It is relatively mild and light. Colombian coffee, however, tends to be more sweet and less acidic (even with some nutty hints), and Brazilian coffee has a less-clean after taste and is more chocolatey and a little creamier.

Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda)

Coffee originated in Ethiopia. According to some well versed coffee lovers out there, this country produces the most pure kind of coffee. This may be because Ethiopia is the only country in which coffee is wildly grown, which makes the flavor profile extremely diverse. African coffees are usually described as complex, fruity and floral. These are stronger, fragrant-rich and full-bodied flavors.

Asia (Indonesia, India, Philippines)

Asian coffees tend to be earthier and darker than most other blends. Unlike the universally liked and known Central American and South American coffees, the unfamiliar beans from Asia tend to inspire extreme opinions: either complete love or absolute dislike. The beans are less acidic, more complex and, at times, even savory.

Image Sources: Nic Taylor under Creative Commons

About this blog

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LATEST REVIEWS

We have published thousands of coffee reviews and espresso reviews since 1997. The reviews below appear in reverse chronological order by review date. Older reviews may no longer accurately reflect current versions of the same coffee. To search for a specific roaster, origin or coffee use the Advanced Search Function.

High-toned, juicy-bright. Pineapple, cocoa nib, lemon verbena, myrrh, narcissus in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with bold, balanced acidity syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Fruit- and cocoa-toned finish supported by narcissus-like floral notes.

Crisply sweet, rich-toned. Baking chocolate, almond butter, honeysuckle, red grape, maple syrup in aroma and cup. Deeply sweet structure with gentle, round acidity full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Baking chocolate and red grape complicate the quiet, nut-toned finish.

Crisply sweet, cocoa toned. Cocoa powder, date, oak, magnolia, hint of cinnamon in aroma and cup. Sweet-toned structure with pert acidity velvety mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to notes of magnolia and oak.

Crisply sweet, complex, cocoa- and floral-toned. Cocoa nib, star jasmine, plum, tangerine zest, agave syrup in aroma and cup. Vibrantly sweet structure with juicy-bright acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. Chocolaty finish with undertones of plum and tangerine zest.

Evaluated as espresso. Roast-rounded, chocolaty. Dark chocolate, gardenia, gently scorched cedar, molasses, prune in aroma and small cup. Viscous, creamy mouthfeel chocolaty, slightly smoky finish. In three parts milk, floral and chocolate notes preside.

Vibrant, gently fruit-toned. Dried apricot, lemon drop, freesia-like flowers, oak, honey in aroma and cup. Sweetly tart structure with brisk acidity full, satiny-smooth mouthfeel. The resonant finish consolidates to notes of lemon balm and honey, supported by fresh-cut oak.

Bright, juicy, fruit-toned. Lychee, plum blossom, Meyer lemon zest, sandalwood, nougat in aroma and cup. Sweetly tart structure with vibrant acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to attractive notes of lychee and nougat with sandalwood undertones.

Rich-toned, chocolaty. Baking chocolate, almond nougat, date, fresh-cut fir, a hint of gardenia in aroma and cup. Sweet in structure with gentle, round acidity full, velvety-smooth mouthfeel. The gently drying finish is chocolaty and richly sweet.

Rich-toned, juicy, complex. Dried persimmon, wild honey, myrrh, almond butter, star jasmine in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with high-toned, vibrant acidity very full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Long, lingering, rich finish that honors all of the cup’s aromatics.

Evaluated as espresso. Chocolaty, fruit-toned, savory-sweet. Chocolate fudge, pomegranate, saltwater taffy, frankincense, hop flowers in aroma and small cup. Creamy mouthfeel complex, resonant finish. The milk shot is equal parts chocolaty, floral, and fruity.

Richly and cleanly fruit-forward. Dried apricot, freesia-like flowers, nougat, cocoa nib, cedar in aroma and cup. Sweet-toned with juicy, bright acidity rich, satiny mouthfeel. Flavor consolidates to pretty notes of dried apricot and nougat with undertones of cedar.

Crisply sweet, deeply rich. Baking chocolate, hazelnut nougat, narcissus, red grape, fresh-cut oak in aroma and cup. Sweet, balanced structure with brisk acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. The finish centers around notes of baking chocolate and hazelnut supported by red grape and fresh-cut oak.

Brightly and brilliantly fruit- and floral-toned. Raspberries on fresh goat cheese, narcissus-like flowers, fresh pipe tobacco, hints of chocolate and musk in aroma and cup. Roundly and gently lactic-tart in structure, with bright acidity full, nectar-like mouthfeel. Deep, rich, flavor-saturated finish.

Delicately bright, balanced, crisply sweet. Bing cherry, cocoa nib, lemon yogurt, lavender, fresh-cut oak in aroma and cup. Sweetly tangy with gently lactic, savory-edged acidity silky, buoyant mouthfeel. A fruit-driven finish is supported by cocoa nib with a continued gentle lactic tang.

Juicy, bright, confidently fruit- and floral-toned. Candy cap mushroom, dark chocolate, kefir, plumeria, mesquite in aroma and cup. Tangy-sweet structure with lactic-toned acidity plush, syrupy mouthfeel. Long, resonant, flavor-saturated finish.

Pungently sweet-savory, deep, expressive. Dark chocolate, dried mango, fine musk, rum barrel, honeysuckle in aroma and cup. Richly sweet-savory structure with roundly tart acidity full, creamy mouthfeel. Particularly musky, fruit-toned finish with dark chocolate undertones.

Lactic, chocolaty, sweetly tart. Young goat cheese, dark chocolate, roasted pine nut, persimmon, fresh-cut cedar in aroma and cup. Tart-sweet structure with deeply tangy, lactic acidity very full, syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. Finish consolidates to an attractive chocolate-toned kefir.

Earth-toned, richly sweet-savory. Moist cedar, breadfruit, magnolia, cocoa powder, musk. Savory-leaning with sweetly brisk acidity light-footed, smooth mouthfeel. A hazelnut-like note emerges in the finish, alongside cocoa powder and moist cedar.

Crisply chocolaty, delicately sweet. Baking chocolate, vanilla bean, pink peppercorn, lavender, cedar in aroma and cup. Crisply sweet, balanced structure with bright but lush acidity delicately silky mouthfeel. Wood-framed finish with undertones of vanilla and lavender.

Rich, deep, resoundingly lactic and pungent. Distinct dark chocolate, blue cheese, lily-like flowers, vanilla, pipe tobacco. Savory sweet structure tangy acidity. Plush, velvety mouthfeel. The chocolate and blue cheese notes sustain in a surprisingly balanced, harmonic finish.


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