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9 Great Bottles of Prosecco

9 Great Bottles of Prosecco


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Top sparklers from the northeastern Italian region

Prosecco was one of the great stories of 2011 for several reasons. First was the great growth that continued for this fresh and fruity sparkler from the northeast of Italy, but beyond that was the intriguing change that came to prosecco.

Prosecco was starting to become a generic name for a wine made with the prosecco grape. As you might imagine, prosecco producers who made the wine in traditional areas were not thrilled by the general use of what is both the name of a specific wine as well as a specific town in Italy.

But that was the name of the grape, and of course, all of us variety-obsessed New World types just had to have the name of the grape on the label. Even if, or especially if, that name was prosecco and you were producing a wine that could benefit from all the hard work prosecco producers (those Italian types) had done over the years.

One small hitch — the grape is not named prosecco, but rather glera, which was reaffirmed in 2009 when DOCG rules were crafted for prosecco. So get your glera anywhere you want, but your prosecco, all crisp, with low alcohol and a touch of sweetness accenting its peach and pear flavors, remains rooted in the vines that surround Conegliano and Valdobbiadene. Now there’s a word we could all use some help with.

Click here for the 9 Great Bottles of Prosecco Slideshow.

— Gregory Dal Piaz, Snooth


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


Why Prosecco Is the Best Bubbly for Brunch

There are a million good reasons to pop a cork. The real question is what kind of cork we want to pop. There are basically three categories of bubbles to choose from: Champagne, Cava and Prosecco. Each has its own distinct characteristics, flavors, and style, which dictate when and how I want to serve and sip each one.

For brunch, my choice is Prosecco.

A Brief Introduction to Prosecco

The Italian version of sparkling wine is made from the Prosecco grape, which is native to the Veneto region, in the northeastern part of the country. Like other bubbles, it undergoes a second fermentation, but this process occurs in stainless steel tanks, rather than bottles. (If you want to get geeky, this is known as the Charmat method.)

The end result is bubbly that’s bright, fruity, and slightly sweet — and made for drinking immediamante. That’s because Prosecco has larger, less stable bubbles than Cava and Champagne (both of which are made using the Champagne method).

That doesn’t mean you have to down it rather that you should look for a bottle that hasn’t been sitting on the shelf for ages. This is one wine where younger is definitely better.

Why Prosecco Is Great for Brunch

This delightful wine is both extremely affordable and widely available: You can now choose from a range of Proseccos in nearly any wine store. This fact alone makes it ideal for brunch, when you want an easy, economical way to pour bubbly for a crowd.

But don’t just serve it because it is affordable — Prosecco’s light and bright flavor is extremely versatile. It pairs with sweet and savory, and its sweetness also makes it a good mate for spicy foods.

It’s also true that Prosecco, with 11 to 12 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), tends to be slightly less alcoholic than other sparkling wines. And when you’re talking about day-drinking, low alcohol is key. Serve it on its own, or dilute even further by making mimosas or bellinis.


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