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Baltimore Mortician Opens Fresh Grocery to Stop People From Dying Early

Baltimore Mortician Opens Fresh Grocery to Stop People From Dying Early


A Baltimore mortician has opened a fresh produce store to help his local community eat better food

“I thought that if nobody was going to do it, we will have to do it ourselves,” March said.

Erich March, a mortician in Baltimore, is segueing slightly from his day job to do something to help stop members of his community from dying early. He has opened a fresh grocery store in the middle of a food desert — a region of the country that contains substantially less fresh produce and fewer whole foods than fast food and processed options, or none at all.

The newly opened Apples & Oranges Fresh Market in East Baltimore, run by March and his wife, Michele Speaks-March, aims to restore the area to its former glory, when March was a young child shopping with his family.

“Nothing was prepackaged and precious little was frozen,” March told BlackDoctor.org. “When my mother and grandmother shopped there, they went home with buckwheat flour and shopping bags full of turnips, carrots, and buttermilk. It was as colorful an urban experience as Baltimore had to offer.”

The decision to open Apples & Oranges, March said, also came out of sheer necessity. Although he approached larger chains to bring grocery options to the neighborhood, those stores were not interested in expanding his neighborhood.

“I thought that if nobody was going to do it, we will have to do it ourselves,” March said. “It’s a mission, an exciting mission. We’ve had nothing but encouragement.”


Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

Food history sizzles on stage at the National Museum of American History
Once a month, we turn up the heat on food history at the museum’s demonstration kitchen on the Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Cooking Up History showcases a guest chef and our resident food historian, Dr. Ashley Rose Young, preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. While we are not permitted to serve food from the stage, you can try a dish inspired by the demonstration in the museum’s café, Eat at America’s Table.

2020 marks the Smithsonian’s pan-institutional celebration of women, which coincides with the 100 th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States. In alignment with the institution’s annual theme, Cooking Up History programs will highlight objects and stories about women. During demonstrations, we will explore questions about women’s culinary expertise, work life, political activism, entrepreneurship, and more:

  • How have women shaped foodways in the United States over the past 250 years?
  • How did women’s suffrage advocates spread the word and raise money for their cause through the publication of cookbooks?
  • What tools and technologies made the home cook’s life easier over time?
  • What role have girls played in the making of the United States’ culinary culture?
  • How have women and girls overcome structural inequalities at home and in the workforce?

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