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Stovetop Pumpkin Purée Recipe

Stovetop Pumpkin Purée Recipe



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Ingredients

  • One 6-8 pound pumpkin

Directions

Begin to boil the water for steaming the pumpkin.

Rinse the pumpkin, then, using a serrated knife cut the pumpkin in half. With an ice cream scooper or large spoon, remove the strings and seeds. Cut the pumpkin into 6-10 pieces, small enough to fit numerous pieces into a steaming basket.

Steam for 15-25 minutes. Pumpkin is cooked when a toothpick easily pierces its skin. Let cool, then peel or cut skin off and discard. Keep remaining pumpkin "meat." Using a handheld blender, standing blender, or food processor, purée pumpkin meat.


Skillet Pumpkin Pie Recipe

My mother’s ‘famous’ recipe for skillet pumpkin pie.

  • Posted byShawn Williams
  • November 13, 2017
  • 6 Comments

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive a commission if you click a link and purchase a product I recommend.

Pumpkin pie has been a Thanksgiving obsession of mine for as long as I can remember. I’m OBSESSED. Thanksgiving is NOT Thanksgiving without pumpkin pie. It’s non-negotiable in my eyes.

If I know pumpkin pie won’t be wherever I’m celebrating stuffing my face, I’ll bring it myself. It’s that important to me. Could I skip the entire meal and only eat pumpkin pie? Probably. Well…maybe not the stuffing.

Rich pumpkin puree on a soft crust with a dollop of delicious whipped cream (and maybe some homemade cinnamon ice cream). There’s no other way. Now, I make my recipe exactly as my mom has always made it, but my only special twist is I make my pumpkin pie in a cast iron skillet. Because this is my blog and I do everything in a cast iron skillet.


Can You Freeze Pumpkin Puree?

Obviously, we’re not the only ones who ended up with too much pumpking puree, especially during the height of pumpkin-season, when we’re trying to integrate it into everything and anything. Here’s the message we received from one of our readers:

I opened several cans of pumpkin puree to make pies with, only to realize that I didn’t have enough pie crusts to make as many pies as I had originally intended. I don’t have the time to continue to make the pies any time soon, but I now have leftover pumpkin puree that I don’t know what to do with.

I’ve heard that pumpkin doesn’t freeze well, and it would be a shame to see all that perfectly good puree go to waste. I would like to try to freeze it if it’s not a horrible idea. Can you freeze pumpkin puree?

Of course you can freeze pumpkin puree! Think about all those frozen pumpkin pies that are sold around Thanksgiving. They’re full of pumpkin puree, and they freeze just fine.

There’s no reason you can’t freeze your pumpkin puree until you’re ready to use it to make some pies of your own. The key to freezing pumpkin puree successfully is making sure that it doesn’t get freezer burn, and that it doesn’t pick up any other flavors from foods in the freezer.


More in the Waste Not Series:


Instructions

Preheat oven to 400°F. Remove pumpkin stem. Cut pumpkin in half from top to bottom. Scoop out seeds and discard (or save to make your own roasted pumpkin seeds). Cut each piece in half again, so you have 4 quarters. Sprinkle flesh with salt. Place cut-side down on large parchment-lined shallow baking pan.

Roast about 40 minutes, or until skin is soft and flesh is very tender when pierced with a fork. Cool completely on wire rack.

Scoop flesh from skin and transfer to food processor. Process about 3 to 5 minutes, gradually adding water and scraping sides as needed, until smooth. Add cinnamon pulse until well blended.

Use pumpkin puree for baking, just as you would canned pumpkin. Store in airtight container in refrigerator up to 1 week.


17 Simple and Easy Pumpkin Puree Recipes

With a spoonful of pureed pumpkin, it's easy to add in the savory flavor everybody's craving come fall. Stock up on a few cans or skip the store-bought stuff and check out these three easy ways to make your own.

It probably comes as no surprise that this classic crowd-pleaser uses two whole cans of the stuff.

With a scoop of pumpkin puree, cinnamon, sugar and spices, you can recreate the trendy coffee-shop treat at home . for just 40 cents a cup!

This fluffy, marshmallowy meringue topping can salvage the most uneven of cakes. And, its sweetness pairs well with warm pumpkin spices.


Recipe Summary

Cut stem off of pumpkin to create a hole using a good, strong knife, as cutting through a pumpkin can be tricky. Scoop and scrape pulp and seeds out of pumpkin, saving seeds to roast later. Cut pumpkin in quarters. Cut quarters in 1/2 again.

Place pumpkin pieces in a microwave-safe bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap, tight enough to not let any steam or moisture escape during cooking time.

Microwave for 7 minutes, checking seal of plastic wrap halfway through cooking time to ensure no moisture is not escaping. Continue cooking in the microwave for another 8 minutes. Remove plastic wrap by pulling wrap furthest from you back towards you, allowing hot steam to escape away from you. Let cool for 10 minutes.

Peel skin from pumpkin using your fingers.

Puree peeled pumpkin using a food processor, hand masher, or a potato ricer.


Pumpkin Apple Baked Beans

On a chilly, Fall day, these baked beans combine pumpkin and apple for a hearty side dish from Aube Giroux of the Kitchen Vignettes blog.

Ingredients

Directions

Aube Giroux is a food writer and filmmaker who shares her love of cooking on her farm-to-table blog, Kitchen Vignettes.

Aube is a passionate organic gardener and home cook who likes to share the stories of how food gets to our dinner plates. Her work has been shown on television and at international film festivals. Her web series was nominated for a 2014 James Beard Award. In 2012, she was the recipient of Saveur Magazine’s Best Food Blog award in the video category.


Recipes with Canned Pumpkin

Are you ready to see 10 of the most delicous recipes you can make using canned pumpkin? Here, you’ll find everything from dessert to dinner recipes you can enjoy!

Pumpkin Spice Cookie Dough Dip

This pumpkin dip recipe is made with all natural ingredients and goes great with apple slices, crackers, bananas, or by the spoonful, your choice!

And you can see out how easy this whips up in this video!

Pumpkin Overnight Oats

One of the best things you could ever do to amp up your morning oats! The pumpkin makes these oats extra creamy and hearty. The best part is that you can make as little or as much of these overnight oats as you have leftover pumpkin, the recipe is super easy to adjust.

Pumpkin Scones

These Pumpkin Scones recipe can be made gluten-free and grain-free. It is perfectly soft on the inside and drizzled with a cinnamon glaze. It’s all the fall “feels” in each bite.

The bonus? Once baked, these pumpkin scones can be frozen too! Simply thaw and eat. Yes, you can also warm them up in the microwave for about 30 seconds for an epic breakfast or snack.

Creamy Pumpkin Pasta

I call it “gold in a bowl!”- this pasta dish is incredibly creamy and does NOT taste like pumpkin pie, more like al dente pasta tossed in a rich cheesy sauce. YUM!

Healthy Pumpkin Chia Pudding

Ch-ch-ch-chia! I had too. All jokes aside these chia seeds are super healthy, full of fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, that plus pumpkin purée, and you will be doing your body a favor!

Pumpkin Cookies

Forget the store-bought frosted cookies, you deserve a homemade, frosted pumpkin cookie… or two.

Pumpkin pancakes

Are you really even enjoying the fall season if you don’t make at least one batch of pumpkin pancakes? Bonus points if you serve them with whipped cream!

No bake pumpkin pie bites

Bite-size treats that taste like pumpkin pie and they’re good for you! Make them for a snack or on the go breakfast with hot coffee!

Pumpkin swirl brownies

It’s a combo between fudgy brownies and homemade pumpkin pie, in other words, YOU NEED THIS.


How to Make Homemade Pumpkin Puree to Use In Your Favorite Fall Recipes

Skip the canned stuff and cash in on this made-from-scratch recipe.

Fresh pumpkin isn't to be feared. We've got three easy ways to make pumpkin puree ahead of time &mdash baking, boiling, or steaming &mdash that can be frozen until you're ready to whip up a pumpkin pie or another fall-friendly meal. (Psst, if you need more inspiration, check out these delicious pumpkin recipes.)

To note: As a general rule, 3 pounds of fresh pumpkin will yield about 3 cups of mashed and cooked pumpkin.

Option 1: Bake It

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. Rinse the pumpkin under cool water to rid the skin of any residual dirt and dry well with a clean towel.
  3. Cut the pumpkin in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a metal spoon or ice cream scoop. Save the seeds for toasting, if you like, and discard the innards.
  4. Rub the cut surfaces with oil. Place them, cut side down, in a roasting pan and add 1 cup of water to the pan.
  5. Bake in the oven until the flesh is tender when pierced with a knife. This takes approximately 90 minutes.
  6. When tender, remove the pumpkin halves from the oven and place on a flat surface to cool.
  7. Once cool enough to handle, but not cold, scoop out the pumpkin flesh.
  8. Puree the pumpkin in a food processor, food mill,hand blender, or by hand.
  9. Pumpkin flesh holds a lot of moisture. Line a sieve or fine mesh colander with paper towel or a coffee filter and set over a deep bowl. Let drain for about 2 hours and stir occasionally.

Option 2: Boil It

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.
  2. In the meantime, rinse the pumpkin under cool water to rid the skin of any residual dirt and dry well with a clean towel.
  3. Cut the pumpkin in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a metal spoon or ice cream scoop. Save the seeds for toasting, if you like, and discard the innards.
  4. Cut the pumpkin into evenly-sized smaller pieces and peel.
  5. Add to the boiling water and cook for about 25 minutes or until the flesh is tender when pierced with a knife.
  6. Puree the pumpkin in a food processor, food mill,hand blender, or by hand.

Option 3: Steam It

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil that will hold a vegetable steamer or colander.
  2. In the meantime, rinse the pumpkin under cool water to rid the skin of any residual dirt and dry well with a clean towel.
  3. Cut the pumpkin in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a metal spoon or ice cream scoop. Save the seeds for toasting, if you like, and discard the innards.
  4. Cut the pumpkin into evenly sized smaller pieces and peel.
  5. Place the pumpkin pieces in a steamer or metal colander and over the boiling water. Cover and let steam for about 50 minutes or until the flesh is tender when pierced with a knife.
  6. Puree the pumpkin in a food processor, food mill,hand blender, or by hand.

Then freeze it!

Once the puree has cooled entirely, place in freezer containers or ice cube trays. Leave room at the top (headspace) of the containers or individual ice cube compartments. Label, date, and freeze the puree for future use. Enjoy!